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Love Sarah (12A)

Love Sarah

There’s nothing half-baked about this gentle and warm-hearted bakery-setdrama about family, community and later life romance. Cakes feature prominently.


Determined to fulfil her late mother's dream of opening a bakery in charming Notting Hill, 19-year-old Clarissa enlists the help of her mother's best friend Isabella and her eccentric estranged grandmother Mimi (Celia Imrie). There is more than a cinnamon whiff of Richard Curtis about this film which makes no apology for its romanticised affection for London. Celia Imrie’s performance is worth it alone is a delight, ‘exuding the energy of an angry man who hasn’t had a nap this afternoon’


UK 2020 Eliza Schroeder 97m


Book Tickets

Thursday 22 Oct 202015:00 Book Now

Parasite (15)

Parasite

Parasite (15)

Gisaengchung


The 2019 Palme D’Or winner is an urgent, brilliantly layered look at timely social themes, which finds writer-director Bong Joon Ho in near-total command of his craft.


In this pitch-black modern fairytale, we meet the Park Family: the picture of aspirational wealth. And the Kim Family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children expediently install themselves as tutor and art therapist, to the Parks. Soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families. The Kims provide "indispensable" luxury services while the Parks obliviously bankroll their entire household. When a parasitic interloper threatens the Kims' newfound comfort, a savage, underhanded battle for dominance breaks out, threatening to destroy the fragile ecosystem between the two families. This has been hailed by some critics as a nearly perfect film, from Bong's masterful use of framing and visual language and control of a wildly shifting tone to the performances (all terrific) to the commentary on class division. A fitting movie for our times, that you must see before the inevitable American remake sands down all its razor-sharp edges.

(Subtitles)

South Korea 2019 Bong Joon Ho 132m


Book Tickets

Thursday 22 Oct 202019:00 Book Now (Black & White Version - )